Reviews by manonamora

seedcomp

View this member's profile

Show ratings only | both reviews and ratings
View this member's reviews by tag: antiromancejam barebonesjam Concours FI concoursmoiki ectocomp French goncharov ifcomp independent release inkjam introcomp la-nuit neotwinyjam nouvim3000 orifice jam other jam parsercomp partim500 punyjam recipejam revivaljam seedcomp sens-dessus-dessous shufflecomp singlechoice smoochiejam springthing
...or see all reviews by this member
1-10 of 18 | Next | Show All


Hidden Gems, Hidden Secrets, by Naomi Norbez, Josh Grams

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Not so hidden secrets, April 2, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Hidden Gems, Hidden Secrets is a Twine game set in a Discord server, where members of the Hidden Gems Of Poetry Group interact, led by Dr. Cornelius Harper, a retired professor with a passion for poetry. Prior to the creation of this space, each member had some sort of connection with Cornelius (who calls himself Corn), many seeing him as a mentor. The server is also moderated by his trans grandson.

But on that day, two collisions shock the group: a literal one, leaving the life of Cornelius in the balance waiting for surgery, and a more metaphorical one as a secret threatens the bond of this small community. Obviously, the two events couldn't have come at a worse time...
In between beats of conversation, we are able to see personal exchanges between Corn and each member, during different time periods. These, coupled with the live messages in-chat, allows you to paint a clear picture of the man and his actions. There are hints from the start to what is going to happen, and what has happened (Spoiler - click to show)who knows how many times. The implications are pretty damning.

Honestly, I thought this game was completely linear at first. Before sending the first message, I tried clicking on the side arrows to see what it would do, but since nothing happened, I chalked it off as just "for show" (turns out, not every message has a choice, but the arrows always look the same). So I had, for better or for worse, the "middle ending" right off the bat. I've checked the other two endings, and I'm certainly glad I got this one first. Though none of the path feel "good", one feels realistic but disappointing (in the other members), the other quite uncomfortable (though it could probably lead to a "better" outcome for most).
Though I think most players would favour the more salacious choices, with how they are listed on the screen...

I think it would have driven the point further if we were able to go through previous conversations in the server. From the first live conversation, it is clear the users know each other well by now, and have created strong bonds with one another (and with Corn). But the only channel with potentially substantial discussion also starts with Sorry, older messages can't be loaded, per the settings in this server., which wouldn't make sense if you are a member of a server (why would all the messages be hidden every time someone logs off? especially for the purpose of discussions), but also thwart the possibility of understanding who the users are (what do they like? what kind of writing to they do? etc) and how they usually behave with one another (do they fight and make up? are they always friendly? how does Corn fits into their dynamics). Instead, you end up as an onlooker peering into what is happening right now and also controlling the members as puppets (I mean, you kind of are for the purpose of the story) - kinda weirdly voyeuristic?

On the interface side, I would have preferred if it had been a bit closer to the actual Discord interface, whether it is the palette use (I know you can change it on browser, but it would have been suuuuper unlikely everyone used the same green palette, especially considering how different the characters are) or the placement of elements on the screen. Though it was smart to keep the messages of the "playable" user separate from the rest of the chat, and each user getting their personal pfp.

Definitely a confronting game, thought not completely unrealistic. Interesting mechanic and interface wise, discomforting story wise.

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

Cozy Simulation 2999, by KADW

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
The cabin of your dream..., April 2, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Cozy Simulation 2999 is the coziest Twine experience you will ever have. Set in a remote cabin in the mountain during winter, you get to enjoy peace and tranquillity, with all the comfort and activities you'd want to have. Maybe you could just spend your day staring at the fire, or drink all kinds of warming drinks, or you might be more into eating to your heart's content or creating meaningful art pieces... or how about taking a walk outside huh?

Sounds enticing doesn't it? Not having to worry about anything else but the coziness of yourself in an idyllic (and strangely isolating) settings. Being taken care of by a lovely narrator that not only listens to your wishes but expand your ability to do things as time pass. Isn't it JUST NICE and definitely not skin crawling when you stop and think about all the things that seem just a tad out of place, or details that just don't quite add up... and what about those memories that keep haunting your dreams?

But are you truly ready to open the door and find out?

Ok some spoily stuff I liked
(Spoiler - click to show)the contrast between the simulation and real life (he I clocked that at the start but it was just too cozy to matter), the pretty eerie descriptions of items hinting at something that happened, the eviscerating descriptions in the "real" world with the conveyor belt of bodies... Going from the cozy end to the less than cozy ones is exciting but creepy as heck!

It's a really cool game for a first Twine game attempt!

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

Faery: Swapped, by mathbrush

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Tag, you're it!, April 2, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Faery: Swapped is a short parser games where the central puzzle revolves around swapping names of things/people in the correct order to reach the end. As the title suggests, you (a non-descript child) believe 100% that the new arrival in the family is not actually your sibling but a changeling (swapped by fairies), though no one seem to care about your convictions. Since no one wants to listen to you (because what else but a changeling cant this wrinkled thing be?), you set yourself to prove it to everyone! Problem is: the baby is kept out of your reach.

The mechanic is pretty unusual (and I would love to check out the code behind it!) and ends up making things quite confusing after a few swaps - you will need to keep track of what is what to get to the end. Or write single detail down and make a plan before getting into the game.
It took me a while to get the hang on the puzzle itself and the order of the swaps. I had to restart a few times because I kept losing track of what I had swapped xD
Luckily, if you get stuck, there are some handy hints (given bit by bit so you don't spoil yourself too fast) to help.

A very neat puzzle!

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

1 4 the $, by Charm Cochran

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
Pro-Tip: Do not play while eating, or just after having eaten..., April 1, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Preambule: this was a good game that borked my brain a bit and put my thoughts in disorder. There is sense somewhere in this review, I think.

1 4 the $ is a Twine story about despair, the want to belong and feel loved, and manipulation. With a gloomy setting, where you play as a probably mentally ill, unemployed recluse, the game explores dark and confronting subjects: consumption in all its form. Going through the ups and downs of life (but mainly the downs) at the bottom of the barrel, you follow the protagonist's "last" days as they stumble upon a new crypto get-rich-quick scheme all the while dealing with a run-down lodging taken over by (a probably) sentient mould.
I say "last days" because of where the different endings take you.

The depiction of consumption in 1 4 the $ is multifaceted and very intriguing. From the literal aspect of the player consuming to sustain (even if it means eating literal mould), the mould taking over the protagonist's body until it consumes it all, online communities taking advantages of its members for entertainment, crypto shills targetting exploiting the gullible and disadvantaged. Everything is linked in some kind of way, working against/with each other to form the story, helping us (the reader) understand how the protagonist got where they are and the choice they make.

And on a level, it does not seem "bad", as the protagonist yearns for community themself, to feel understood or maybe just recognised and love, to feel like they have some sort of purpose or goal beyond feeling sorry for themself. In one path, they seem content to lose themself just to be a part of a thing. Or because they just can't fight anymore. Which ever depiction of the protagonist you end up with is incredibly bleak.

I quite liked the atmospheric background, with the glowing light animation, whose colour will depict a different part of the house, or the formatting of the text replicating social media platforms like Reddit or Discord, as well as the uneasy screens when you "talk" to the mould/yourself. The simple design added quite a bit to the disturbing vibe of the game.
Just small accessibility thing: the blue links are often not contrasted enough against the background.

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

Dungeons & Distractions, by E. Joyce

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
Tip-toeing between feel-good and anxious-mess, April 1, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

If you've heard of D&D, get ready for its unfocused cousin: Dungeons & Distractions!

This game hits all the right spots: it's light-hearted with realistic characters and situations (even if everyone got mixed up with the witching hour), the writing is witty and simply delightful, you get thrown to the wolves without clear winning/losing actions, and it's just a fun time...

... unless you can't managed to keep the distractions down and find yourself failing your players by being a too unfocused DM. For you, an AD&D wolf-person proposed to set up a one-shot with a couple of friends, with the intention of making it a recurrent thing. But that will only happen if you manage to keep your player on track and end the session right on time. And your players are not the easiest ones to deal with, between your TTRPG-experienced girlfriend that tries to be "helpful", the easily bored witch with silver clunky bracelets (and you're a werewolf, remember?), the executive deficient player who can't make up her mind in how to act, ... Many wrenches are thrown in your path, and you will need to keep your head cool enough to get the session right back on track if you want to wrap up before the timer runs out.

I wasn't surprised that on my first run of the game I didn't fail terribly, but just enough not to get the good ending. I reached the bad guy lair, and introduced it before... timer ran out and the party broke apart. Pretty fitting for my I'd say xD

It was the perfect palate cleanser (for when I played it)!

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

The Film, by studiothree, and LoniBlu, and precariousworld

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
The film that changed everything, April 1, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

The Film is a surreal Interactive Fiction piece following a group of friend dealing with the anniversary of the loss of Marko, the "glue" of their group. To commemorate his memory, they watch the hard-to-find Director's cut of the cult movie Narcissus. During the movie, each individual goes through a psychedelic experience and is forced to confront their truth and their relationship with the rest of the group.

The different endings can be reached depending on the choice each individual make. Some are bittersweet, some are bone-chilling. Although it does not seem like there is a lot you can do, the choices does branch out quite widely, especially by the time you reach the ending.

Considering the seeds chosen by the authors, this was not really where I thought the game would end up going, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. The confrontation of each individual about their personal relationship with Marko and the others, especially. It was so raw and unnerving.

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

Found Journal, by KnightAnNi

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
When the void stares back with words., March 31, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Found Journal is an atmospheric kinetic entry, where you get to go through a page (or more?) of a journal left behind by some lost soul. Using as a base a weirdcore/distorted track, the short entry deals with feelings of loss (of self? relationship? someone?) and ambiguity. Illustrations have also been included within the pages, to accentuate the feelings of loneliness and helplessness.

It made me feel very uneasy (in a good way) by the time I reached the final page, but still hopeful the writer might have found a happy ending (though I very much doubt it). It was a vibe!

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

Sonnet, by TaciturnFriend

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Hit on your friend, hit on your married friend, hit everyone!, March 31, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Sonnet is a relatively short game made in Twine, where you play as Will, a man invited to a single's Valentine's Day party, organised by a long-time and long-single rich friend of yours. As one could assume, where party are at, drama soon follows. The entry uses two seeds: "Palate" for the colour scheme of the interface, and "Reverse a Poem", taking the romantic and languishing "Sonnet 128" to a more salacious and less than chivalrous setting. Rather than long romantic bouts to express your love, why not a one night stand with your eccentric friend or your hot - but also still very married - other eccentric and musical friend?

The game is pretty cheeky in its interpretation of the main seed and the poem, and made me giggle quite a bit in the hidden references (especially Henry's description). It was also fun trying on the different paths and conversations, and reaching the multiple available endings. The game is sectioned into four parts (each named after a poetry term), formatted as strechtext when clicking on the different options. At the end of each part, you have the choice to restart it or continue to the next part. However, only the final part actually has consequences to the ending.

I did run into some conversation issues (bothering the Aline when first meeting her to the point of repeating the same text, or punctuation errors) and often ended up restarting the current part instead of continuing to the next one (switching the order of the links or maybe having one on top of the other would make more sense).

It was still quite entertaining for its size.

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

All The Games I Would Have Made For Seedcomp If I Had The Time (Which I Did Not) (Oh Well There's Always Next Year), by Cerfeuil

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Hella Meta SeedComp game, March 21, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

All The Games I Would Have Made For Seedcomp If I Had The Time (Which I Did Not) (Oh Well There's Always Next Year) is a short game going all on the meta, about the SeedComp! format and game reception. It emulates participating at the last possible minute in the competition, and finding what people think of that entry.

The game is essentially those two screens: picking the seeds from the SeedComp! you want to mix together into a game, and the IFDB page for said-game with its information and a handful of reviews. If I counted correctly (which I probably have not), there seems to be 5? possible games to check out.
While you don't get to play the games (all of them sounding like a riot - I hope you end up making them, KADW), there is just enough information to imagine what those games could have looked, how their atmosphere would have been, how fun the gameplay would have felt (or not). It's kind of bizarre (but fun bizarre) to play the game in your head rather than for real.

Now I wonder how it would look like with all 90 seeds of this edition XD

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 

Poetic Justice, by Onno Brouwer

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
Poet on trial, March 13, 2024
by manonamora
Related reviews: seedcomp

Poetic Justice is a short poetic and logical game made in Dendry, where you play as a legendary unnamed (at the start) poet on trial for plagiarism. On the bench, sit your peers, other iconic poets, ready to judge you. Will you manage to refute their arguments or face justice?
Worried about fairness? You get to choose one of those judges are your poet representative (though it ends up barely mattering... but you get to learn a bit more about them with a Wikipedia snippet).

Because it is also a fair trial, you get to review the evidence against you, before refuting each of the poets' arguments (I'm not sure why you need to fight your own lawyer, but \_(ツ)_/). It's pretty much a breeze. But your own arguments are not enough, you need to trick them to see the idiocy in their thinking.

Which leads us to the main interactive element of the game: a logic puzzle. Each poet writes their own version of one of your poem, and your must choose the right order and combination so they all end up criticising each other. I ended up writing down all the options to get it.

The puzzle was neat. I wished I had more to do in the first half of the game, especially when refuting the arguments of the different poets. Or maybe even lose the trial (I don't think there is a bad ending?).

Was this review helpful to you?   Yes   No   Remove vote  
More Options

 | Add a comment 


1-10 of 18 | Next | Show All