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trading.zip *
Contains trading.hex
For all systems. To play, you'll need a Hugo interpreter - visit the Hugor page on ifwiki.org for download links.
trading.hex
original competition entry
For all systems. To play, you'll need a Hugo interpreter - visit the Hugor page on ifwiki.org for download links.
trading.txt
solution
readme.txt
documentation
TRADMUS
background music resources
TRADGFX
graphics resources
TRADALT
lower-quality compressed graphics and music
* Compressed with ZIP. Free Unzip tools are available for most systems at www.info-zip.org.

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Trading Punches

by Mike Snyder profile

Episode 1 of The Convergence Saga
Science Fiction - Space Opera
2004

Web Site

(based on 12 ratings)
5 reviews

Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: October 1, 2004
Current Version: 1.9
License: Freeware
Development System: Hugo
Forgiveness Rating: Merciful
Baf's Guide ID: 2384
IFIDs:  HUGO-25-29-7A-07-04-06
HUGO-25-1F-48-10-01-04
TUID: t593d66s20bblqt0

Awards

10th Place - 10th Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2004)

Editorial Reviews

>VERBOSE -- Paul O'Brian's Interactive Fiction Page

The game itself is quite solid, too -- it's clear that a whole lot of effort went into this project. Aside from the few bugs I mentioned [earlier], I found the code pleasantly error-free, and the same goes for the writing. The puzzles worked well for me, and the game did an excellent job of providing cues to help me know what I ought to try next. One item in particular was not only quite well-implemented, but also provided an excellent emotional through-line for the story. Trading Punches still has a few details to clean up... but I'd recommend it without hesitation, especially to fans of dramatic fantasy games like Worlds Apart.
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Member Reviews

5 star:
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4 star:
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3 star:
(2)
2 star:
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Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 4
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Most Helpful Member Reviews


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Intercivilizational SF, February 21, 2021
by Rovarsson (Belgium)
Related reviews: SF

You can usually tell the level of my engagement with a game by looking at my notebook. With all the side notes, colored maps, interjections about the story and hypotheses about puzzles and characters, you could say I dove pretty deep into this one.

Trading Punches is a story about two brothers on a turning point of their civilization's history. The protagonist represents humanity (without other reference points, I default to "human" in SF, especially if they're the "good" guys), his brother ends up representing the Sheeear through marriage with the daughter of their ambassador. The relationship between the brothers is reflected in the course of the story on multiple levels: family, society/civilization, even in the creation myth you learn about during the game.

This game is very much a story-centered, narrative one. The puzzles are rather easy, forming no hindrance to the pace of the story.
The structure of the game is also a narrative one: It is divided into chapters.
Each chapter starts with a short dialogue between the protagonist and ... well, that's one of the mysteries of the game. This dialogue serves as a recap for what has come before and as a frame for the upcoming chapter.
Then the chapter proper begins. It is presented as an account of a memory of the protagonist of a turning point in his life, and as such, also a turning point in the relation between the two civilizations.

Now, IF is a tough medium to handle flashbacks elegantly, and Trading Punches only partly succeeds. The general problem with flashbacks in IF is player freedom. How does the author handle the fact that what the PC is doing has already happened, and has a definite outcome? There has to be a way to reign in the player when she deviates too far from the predetermined path. Here, the author does that by confining the action to a tight and focused map per chapter, containing one big puzzle. (This reminds me of Gateway: small map and one puzzle per planet.)
A bigger problem arises when the flashbacks do not take place in the PC's mind, but in a conversation. Whenever I paused mid-chapter and thought about the bigger picture, I felt sorry for my dialogue-partner. What a tedious story it must be to hear an endless list of detailed micro-actions. "And then I looked at the cabinet, and then I looked at the drawer, and then I opened the drawer, and then I found a comb, and then I took the comb, and then I tried combing my hair but it wouldn't work,...)
This is more a recognition of the limits of the IF-medium than a criticism of the game. I think the problem is handled quite well here.
On the other hand, there is a great advantage to using flashbacks. It keeps the attention of the reader on the bigger picture. There is an arc of tension that goes over the flashbacks and grows in the present time of the story. The reader anticipates the story-threads and the consequences of the past actions to come together in the here and now. The game's epilogue does this very well, as well as leaving ample room for the-sequel-that-never-came.

The puzzles are very well clued, even guided. This keeps the focus on the story and keeps it moving forward. However, I do feel that there might be two great logic puzzles lying at the hearts of chapters 1 and 2 that were sacrificed to pacing. It is of course a difficult balancing act.

The writing is no example of efficient IF terseness, rather the opposite.
Long, relaxed and rich paragraphs invite the reader to slow down and enter into the story-world. Together with the background music, this makes for a very immersive experience.
It's also a joy to see the evolution of the characters through the decades that this story describes.

From a technical point of view, I have but a few small nitpicks. A fair number of nouns are unimplemented, something that does break the mood a bit in a game such as this. Some actions could have a wider range of commands to trigger them and some unsuccessful commands could yield a more helpful response instead of a default message. Nothing too serious though.
Overall, Trading Punches is a very fluid playing experience. There is also a very good in-game hint-system on the off chance that you get really stuck.

Recommended for all!


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful:
Captivating, December 3, 2009
by Divide (Wroclaw, Poland)

The game-world is well thought-out, fleshed out, and told in such a graphic way that the illustrations are almost redundant. I loved the technique of having the character recall past events by player reliving them; reminiscent of Spider and Web but put in quite a different context. This also makes mercifulness only natural.

Retrospective episodes are sometimes quite distant in time, but weaved skillfully (with brilliant use of a trinket) into a cohesive story, developing the protagonist (and another character) in much detail. Puzzles also feel natural, not really puzzles at all, just something you do; only at one point I had no idea what to do next (and it turned out to be quite obvious, had I thought as the character would at that point, and not as a player sifting game text for clues does).


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
A "hard sci fi" game about two alien cultures, culture and family, February 3, 2016

This is a story-driven game set in 3 parts, with a prelude, interludes, and a postlude.

The game is about two brothers who witness a new civilization come in contact with their own, the Incenders, a race of humanoid fiery beings. Over time, the brothers deal with a variety of forms of conflict.

The puzzles are a bit odd; the first big puzzle is serving drinks to a large group of people, and this can be tedious. It gets more exciting with dangerous exploration puzzles in parts 2 and 3.

A lot of world building has gone on here, similar to that on Worlds Apart, but on a smaller scale.

Recommended for fans of "hard sci-fi".


See All 5 Member Reviews

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The following polls include votes for Trading Punches:

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I have always thought that music has a huge potential for enhancing IF, more so than graphics has. So what are the best examples of IF games that use music? Note that this poll does not include games with only sound effects; they have to...

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