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Playable in the Quest interpreter for Windows.
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Night House

by Bitter Karella profile

Horror
2016

(based on 16 ratings)
5 reviews

About the Story

It looks different in the dark.

You're eight years old. You wake up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom, but you soon realize that not everything is as it seems in the house tonight. Where has everyone gone? Your family is missing and strange things are lurking in the shadows. Night House is an atmospheric text adventure about things that go bump in the night.


Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: October 1, 2016
Current Version: Unknown
License: Freeware
Development System: Quest
IFID: Unknown
TUID: nbx4lqvtvp9o7tis

Awards

8th Place - 22nd Annual Interactive Fiction Competition (2016)

Editorial Reviews

The Breakfast Review
The puzzle design is cunningly done; there's also a bit of playing with the player's expectations with regard to who the protagonist actually is. I found that revelation quite delicious. A lot of the imagery was also nicely creepy without running over into over-the-top grotesquerie.
See the full review

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Member Reviews

5 star:
(3)
4 star:
(5)
3 star:
(6)
2 star:
(3)
1 star:
(0)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 5
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Most Helpful Member Reviews


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
Creepy, atmospheric late-80s period piece, October 18, 2019
by Steph C
Related reviews: IF Comp 2016

The author of this one is a good friend of mine and I did some playtesting for it, so I'm coming at it from the context of 1) liking the author, 2) sharing a lot of cultural frames of reference with the author, and 3) having played the game several times already and been given hints to get past places where I got stuck.

You are a child wandering around a house at night; the environment (at least at first) is the standard NPC-free house with furniture and objects, but effectively conjures up the eerieness of ordinary things in the dark when you're young. The setting was especially effective to me because it's set not just during childhood, but specifically my childhood, circa 1990-ish: late-eighties action figures, late-eighties game systems, floppy disk computer, Trapper Keepers. Someone older or younger wouldn't find this as instantly relatable, but it worked for me.

Later on you encounter more explicit horror elements, and a sense of ongoing realization that something is off, not just with the house, but with you, and your assumptions about yourself.

This one is written in Quest, a rarely-used format despite its ease of use (for simple stuff, anyway) and some of its nifty features, like the automap. It also provides you with a compass rose, a list of objects, and actions you can do with those objects. I made my first couple of games using Quest and went to some trouble to turn off the suggested actions because I wanted a plain parser game, but they're quite good at making the game accessible; you can do 90% of what you need to do in this game using only a mouse. It's a structure Detectiveland also used to excellent effect.

The remaining 10% is where players are likely to get stuck: there are several places where you have USE things together or GIVE objects using the parser, and the game hasn't trained you to think of that as an option. (There are some places you need to ASK, too, but you're fairly well prompted about what you need to do.) There aren't any actual bugs in the finished version (that I could find), but some of the puzzle solutions are pretty obscure. Most players will likely need to resort to the walkthrough.

(IMPORTANT NOTE: download this one and play it offline if you possibly can! Many players have reported their online sessions being ruined by the hosting site timing out.)


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
A wonderful introduction to IF!, September 22, 2018
by Froggy (UK)
Related reviews: Played 2018, Favourites

This was the first digital interactive fiction game that I've played, and I absolutely fell in love! It's fairly short - I think I completed it in a few hours - but the writing is lovely and descriptive, the backstory is excellent, with lots of little bits of history to piece together, and the twist was great and quite unexpected! I also really warmed to the characters involved in the story, which is a great sign to me that the writing, world- and character-building, and plot are really well thought out and very engaging. I was surprised by how creepy I found it - definitely glad that I played it during daylight, and still had to look over my shoulder several times because the hairs on the back of my neck were standing up! I also really liked the simplistic map format, made it easy to tell where you were but left all the description to the writing and the imagination. 100% loved it.


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Spooky and mildly confusing, with a lot of old Quest stickiness, November 22, 2021
by Wade Clarke (Sydney, Australia)
Related reviews: horror, Quest, IFComp 2016

(This is an edited version of a review I originally wrote for my blog during IFComp 2016.)

Night House is a mystery-horror parser adventure of some spookiness. It mobilises a combination of vintage object-based puzzling (use A on B, B on C, C on D) and methods of backstory revelation popular in both horror films and games of the last couple of decades. The protagonist is an eight year-old child who wakes to a mysteriously empty version of their home and unseen menaces.

If you love amassing a huge inventory of doodads and using them to hurdle hurdles in all kinds of laterally conceived practical ways, Night House will whet that appetite, though the old Quest interface gets in the way A LOT. (In old Quest, when in doubt about verbs, use the phrase USE (A) WITH (B). If still in doubt, right-click any lit objects to see if the action you've been agonisingly trying to phrase correctly happens to be a contextual choice that then shows up.) If you don’t have enough horror tastebuds on your tongue, you mightn't find Night House sufficiently distinguished from things you’ve experienced before. Overall it's a dense puzzler with a pretty good, mildly choppy story that I basically followed but didn't completely follow; I will express some of my ignorances below.

Questions of which character you're playing amongst those presented, and by extension, which sex, come up early in Night House. This element of the game was probably experienced as the mystery element it was probably intended to be by some players (see other reviews) but I fixed on it so hard I began to perceive implementation flaws through it and got bogged down. For instance, controlling how objects are described is one of the best methods for characterisation in IF. And Night House wasn't consistent about this. Some objects were described with typical IF snark. Others were character-specific ("Your sister would kill you if you touched this!" (her Trapper Keeper)). This just made it even harder to decide who I was.

So I didn't get off on the best foot with this adventure, but once I found the flashlight (TORCH) and descended from the top floor, things began to pick up. Progress was well gated by various means. I found things to do now and portals and devices to open later.

The house contents show the game is set in the 1980s-1990s. If this doubles as nostalgia for folks of that vintage (e.g. me. I mean this house has an Apple II in it) the game is still wise enough to stay properly in the child narrator's character and make nothing anachronistic out of the situation.

The practical-going-on-impractical puzzle solutions are probably no weirder than some old Infocom, but eventually I had trouble identifying puzzles because there were all these seemingly unrelated story threads floating about. A father worried about his son. A moral panic involving dinosaur cartoons and toys, complete with a spoonerist joke description of the dinosaur who's similar to Raphael of the Ninja Turtles ("Raphael is cool but crude."). Old newspaper articles about yokel weirdos and Halloween. Collectively, these things didn't offer me much direction about what I should be trying to do in Night House other than solving anything that looked like a puzzle. I don't think the threads integrated fabulously at game's end, but at least I knew what my own character's situation was. And in retrospect, the game's story was denser than first appeared.


See All 5 Member Reviews

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This is version 9 of this page, edited by Zape on 4 May 2021 at 11:59pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item