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The Ascent of the Gothic Tower.gblorb
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by David Welbourn

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The Ascent of the Gothic Tower

by Ryan Veeder profile

2014

Web Site

(based on 28 ratings)
5 reviews

About the Story

A story of mild and non-debilitating obsession.


Game Details

Language: English (en)
First Publication Date: April 2, 2014
Current Version: 1
License: Free
Development System: Inform 7
IFID: B8431B08-75E3-443D-9832-EA62D7B41A9F
TUID: dlutvnw8azuqvq2e

News

Noncommercial release September 1, 2014
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Member Reviews

5 star:
(8)
4 star:
(15)
3 star:
(4)
2 star:
(1)
1 star:
(0)
Average Rating:
Number of Reviews: 5
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Most Helpful Member Reviews


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful:
The Ascent of the Gothic Tower, May 18, 2017
by CMG (NYC)

Along with The Baron, this was one of the first parser games I ever played when I discovered interactive fiction back in 2014. At the time, I thought it was great, but on The Baronís heels it felt less substantial (what wouldnít) and I gave it four stars. Now a few years have passed. The Ascent of the Gothic Tower remains a touchstone for me. It deserves five.

In many ways, this game helped shape my outlook on the parser medium. Itís not about puzzles. Itís not about ďAha!Ē moments that come from deducing the right command to type. Itís not about deep simulation or intricate world modeling. Instead, itís about guiding the player through a sequence of events carefully designed, above all else, to produce a mood.

Your only goal is to ascend a tower with which the player-character is ďmildlyĒ obsessed. No real obstacles stand in your way. Itís twilight, and the tower is located on a campus whose population is thinning as night falls. Youíre alone to contemplate the scenery.

As a traditional short story, this wouldnít work. There isnít much story to tell. As a space to explore, were the game to be stripped to its bare geography, it also wouldnít offer much. Thereís a parking lot, a lawn, some empty halls, etc. These locations arenít compelling on their own, and as I mentioned, theyíre not that deeply implemented. What makes the game is the experience itself that the player has while moving through the environment.

That word, ďexperience,Ē is awfully vague, but itís what matters. A story as the word ďstoryĒ is normally understood isnít required, perhaps isnít even advisable, because the playerís experience is the story.

Itís the writing that does the trick here. Well, it ought to be. This is a text game. When a reader has to interact with text, move through it, move it around, this changes both what text does and what it has to do.

Not just anybody couldíve written a game like this and made it good. Itís good because Ryan Veederís got his finger on your pulse as youíre playing. He knows where youíll try to go, what youíll try to do, what youíre thinking at each step. Heís attuned to the experience you should be having, which allows him to gently guide you along and drop little surprises at the right moments. Finding a plain old quarter on the ground, for example, which you donít even need, feels special.

Wrenlaw is another Veeder game with a similar style. I have to admit, I donít like it as much. It tips more into modern literary melancholy, where youíve got mundane objects and scenes, and theyíre significant because theyíre ever-so-slightly sad. But not too sad. Just enough to feel wistful. This sorta thing, to my taste, is like playing with fire for a writer. Itís really hard to nail. The Ascent of the Gothic Tower, however, pretty much does nail it. Gothic Tower feels more self-assured, and itís certainly more slyly constructed. I don't think it's going to budge from my personal parser canon anytime soon.


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful:
Curious; well-constructed; unique, July 23, 2017

The Ascent of the Gothic Tower is a strange game. Even though the player character's objective is made incredibly clear - to ascend the tower - the experience of playing it feels almost aimless. In away, Ascent is a distillation of one particular theme that runs through many of Veeder's works: "hidden" or tucked-away content, rooms that are fascinating but fully optional, whole complex subsystems, as complex as the rest of the game put together, that an inattentive player could never know they missed. In fact, The Ascent of the Gothic Tower has so much of this kind of thing that it almost feels like the whole game is optional - a sort of array of strange places and interesting experiences, that don't seem to represent any meaningful journey on the part of the player character; I think this feeling is magnified, not diminished, by the fact the player character is embarking on such a literal and (by authorial fiat) emotionally significant journey.

None of this is to say that The Ascent of the Gothic Tower is not a good time. It certainly is! Veeder's mastery of the craft of interactive fiction is on full display here, with charming and well-implemented subsystems of all sorts, and an occasionally eloquent narrator-PC who has his own sort of off-kilter charm.

Playing The Ascent of the Gothic Tower feels like wandering around in a huge, empty, static palace of stone. You have no reason to be there, and no reason to keep moving forward, other than that it's beautiful, and you want to stay. And the fact that you do want to stay is a testament to Veeder's excellent craftsmanship.


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
An exploration game or two, with a fun, easy atmosphere , June 9, 2016

This game is classic Ryan Veeder: smooth implementation and rich settings, a linear story with some tension balanced with down-to-earth humor.

You play as someone who is, in fact, mildly obsessed with climbing to the top of a tower. The tower is described in rich detail.

The game contains a sub-game that is also quite enjoyable, and which uses changes in text over time in a brilliant way.

If you like Ryan Veeder's other games, you'll like this one, and vice versa.


See All 5 Member Reviews

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Polls

The following polls include votes for The Ascent of the Gothic Tower:

Highly atmospheric and immersive games by Cryptic Puffin
I'm looking for games with effective use of location, language, etc. to really immerse you in the locale and the story, no matter the genre-- any game which you felt really taken with the atmosphere would be great. Thank you!

I'm looking for Easter Eggs.. by morganthegirl
I'm somewhat new to IF and was wondering if Easter Eggs are ever hidden in these games as they are in others? If so, which games have them? If there a lot of them, then which ones are the "best"?

Games that inspired you to MAKE a game. by MyTheory
Whether it was the witty dialogue, the charming atmosphere, or the cleverness of the puzzle - you played "this" game and it inspired you to write your own. Selfishly, I'm looking for my own inspiration, but I am also very, very curious...

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This is version 10 of this page, edited by Ryan Veeder on 17 May 2021 at 11:20pm. - View Update History - Edit This Page - Add a News Item