Ratings and Reviews by Cory Roush

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rendition, by nespresso
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De Baron, by Victor Gijsbers
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A Beauty Cold and Austere, by Mike Spivey
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Rogue of the Multiverse, by C.E.J. Pacian
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The Axolotl Project, by Samantha Vick
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The Beetmonger's Journal, by Scott Starkey
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Ariadne in Aeaea, by Victor Ojuel
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Jesse Stavro's Doorway, by Marshal Tenner Winter

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:
Rough around the edges, August 18, 2017
by Cory Roush (Ohio)

The premise of this game is interesting, and you can tell the author has taken some time to flesh out the world and the mechanics of the player's ability. However, this is not a polished game, and a lot of corners seem to have been cut in getting to the end.

I have no idea why I'm looking for Jesse, other than because he's not around. I have no idea why I didn't do more to confront someone who was willing to burn down the house I'm standing in... the main character barely responds and when they do, it's illogical. If you were a time traveler told that your only way to get back home was destroyed, do you think that you'd really be a-okay with that?

The conversations with NPCs are muddled and choppy - a NPC's response to a topic sometimes includes details about the room they are standing in, but there are no limitations on where the NPC can talk about that topic, so on several occasions in the game's first 15-20 minutes, dialogue was taking place in some weird kind of limbo where actions I had previously taken haven't happened yet and my surroundings were different... and unless I jumped ship too early, I don't think that was the author's intention or a gimmick of some kind.

And as a pet peeve, containers in this game are poorly executed. Authors: please design your containers so that when opened, the contents are immediately obvious to the player. It's really monotonous to be subjected to "OPEN FIRST DRAWER. You open the drawer. LOOK IN FIRST DRAWER. The drawer is empty. OPEN SECOND DRAWER. You open the drawer. LOOK IN SECOND DRAWER. There is a flashlight in the drawer."


Trials of the Thief-Taker, by Joey Jones
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Pascal's Wager, by Doug Egan

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful:
Excellent replay value, and (somewhat) educational, August 9, 2017
by Cory Roush (Ohio)

I loved this game. It doesn't take itself too seriously (a game titled Pascal's Wager about religion could EASILY be one of the longest, most verbose and pretentious stories out there) but instead, gives you a series of easy-ish puzzles that are uniquely constructed, with (at least) 6 separate endings.

It took a while to figure out what I was supposed to be doing, though. (Spoiler - click to show)Your goal in each playthrough is not to honour your family's chosen deity, as you would first think, but to instead go against your family's wishes to worship the "opposing" deity. It's easy to determine which deity is your family's chosen one - the command WHO IS GOD, ironically, will reveal that - but there's a certain item found at the very beginning of the game that will help you to determine the deity you're actually looking to serve.

There are some hiccups along the way, of course, but this was a very entertaining game that didn't strain the mind-muscles too much, but still felt like a worthwhile way to spend an hour or two.



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