Raising the Flag on Mount Yo Momma

by Juhana Leinonen profile

Humor
2010

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Number of Reviews: 3
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful:
Everything unfunny is funny again--eventually, December 27, 2011
by Andrew Schultz (Chicago)

Yo Momma jokes were a big hit over ten years ago. Then they got old. RtF brings them back successfully. As a quest for redemption, at where you look to take down Gus, the reigning insult champion at Club Compass, by digging dirt on him. He's got three ugly secrets. Get personal, and you win. You're helped (vaguely) by Joe Mahma, a legend of the art, an in-game hint system that gives about the right amount of nudges, and the ability to move to a room by typing its name.

All this could smooth over a lot of design mistakes, but I didn't find any. The path towards the end of the game is pretty economical--everyone has one purpose, and it's pretty clear whether you need them to do something or you need to push them out of the way. They're based largely on stereotypes here--there're two bouncers, Gus's ditzy girlfriend, Vincent the bully, Gus's posse, a sleazy guy at the bar, and a nerdy guy. We all know the tropes behind these, and the player should have a good general idea what to do. There are a few Lousy Last Points as well, and those quests are fun, too. There're observations about how silly and shallow clubbing can be. You've probably seen a few, but they're fun to revisit in a new context.

In the end, I felt just a bit sorry for Gus, but I guess show business is pretty cutthroat business, especially when it directly involves who gives the best insults.

The only thing I would add is a (Spoiler - click to show)block swearing rule where Yo Momma so threatening, you're worried what she'd do if she heard you, or something--especially considering the game does a great job avoiding swearing. But that's techie talk, and I probably only thought of this because everything else is implemented. I'm glad the game got expanded from speed-if to a full work, because it was satisfying to play and a great reminder that you don't have to be serious to be clever.

Also, extra points for the author including the source with the game. I learned a lot of details from that (beyond the lists of "Yo Mama" insults--one which works, one which doesn't,) and you will, too. It's clear enough that it can double as a hint-book if the in-game hints aren't enough.